•  
  •  
 

Authors

Manoj M. Joshi, Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Grant Government Medical College and Sir JJ Group of Hospitals, Byculla, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Saptarshi Paul, Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Grant Government Medical College and Sir JJ Group of Hospitals, Byculla, Mumbai, Maharashtra, IndiaFollow
Krishnarao N. Bhosle, Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, D Y Patil Medical College, Navi, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Suraj W. Nagre, Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Grant Government Medical College and Sir JJ Group of Hospitals, Byculla, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Hrishikesh Parashi, Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Grant Government Medical College and Sir JJ Group of Hospitals, Byculla, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Manish Jadhao, Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College and Sion Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Kunal Rawekar, Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Government Medical College, Nagpur, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Vignesh Ravikumar, Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Grant Government Medical College and Sir JJ Group of Hospitals, Byculla, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Vishal Sawkar, Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Grant Government Medical College and Sir JJ Group of Hospitals, Byculla, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Joshua A. Selwyn, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine and Biostatistics, Grant Government Medical College and Sir JJ Group of Hospitals, Byculla, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Abstract

Purpose: Although multiarterial grafting or bilateral mammary artery use is being increasingly emphasized for contemporary coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) practice, saphenous vein graft (SVG) still accounts for 80% of all CABG conduits (Park et al., 2020) [1]. In India, both the individual and sequential saphenous grafting techniques are used arbitrarily, and there has not been a study that compares the mid-term patency of these two. This is specially relevant in view of smaller coronaries in Indians than the Caucasian counterparts. This study aims to compare the patency for on pump CABG's. Methods: In the present study, 323 patients underwent either sequential (group A, N ¼ 151 grafts, each graft having two anastomoses each) or individual (group B, N ¼ 344 grafts) saphenous vein CABG, between February 2014 and June 2017. The SVG anastomoses were created on obtuse marginal (OM1/OM2) and posterior descending artery (PDA). The graft patency of the vein grafts as well as the left internal mammary artery were assessed by serial coronary angiograms. Results: Results were evaluated at 6 months, 1, 2 and 3 years post operatively. Group A showed a higher graft patency at 3 years at 80.8%, and group B, 67.1% (P ¼ 0.002). Also, anastomoses on sequential conduits had overall better patency rates at three years (77.2% vs 67.2%, P ¼ 0.005). The groups showed similar results at one year post operatively. Conclusions: Sequential bypass grafts were associated with superior mid-term patency compared with individual grafts. These findings suggest the more favourable results of sequential bypass grafting to be attributed to the enhanced flow haemodynamics.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Received Date

18 December 2020

Included in

Cardiology Commons

Share

COinS